The Hunter Family
An historical and photographic perspective

William Adam Hunter & Margaret Elizabeth Copland in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

The Hunter Family of Dumfriesshire, Scotland

William Adam Hunter &

Margaret Elizabeth Copland
Born: June 17, 1845 Born: April 18, 1849
Place: Dunscore, Dumfriesshire Place: Bankend Cottage, Kirkgunzeon, Kircudbrightshire
Married: Dec 22, 1870
Place: Kirkgunzeon, Kircudbrightshire
Died: Sept 12, 1894 Died: Feb 18, 1940
Place: Llewellyn, Saskatchewan, Canada Place:  Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
Buried: Llewellyn Cemetery Buried: Llewellyn Cemetery
 
William Adam Hunter (born June 17, 1845, son of William Hunter & Margaret Kerr) married Margaret Elizabeth Copland (born April 18, 1849) on Dec 22, 1870, in Kirkgunzeon, Kircudbrightshire, Scotland. They had seven children: Mary Kerr Hunter (b. Sept 17, 1871, in Hamilton, Ontario, d. 1956); Barbara Elizabeth Hunter (born April 19, 1874, in Cayuga, Ontario, d. Sept 19, 1951); Margaret Isabella Hunter (b. May 27, 1877, in Cayuga, Ontario, d. Nov 7, 1931); Janet Nicholas Hunter (b. Aug 31, 1880, in Cayuga, d. Aug 7, 1962); Ellen Agnes Copland Hunter (b. Aug 9, 1882, in Cayuga, Ontario, d. Aug 7, 1960); and twins James Copland Hunter and William Adam Hunter (b. June 27, 1887, in Camp Hill Farm north of Saskatoon). William Adam Hunter, Jr. drowned in the North Saskatchewan River on Aug 12, 1906, and James Copland Hunter died on April 5, 1979, in Saskatoon).

Mary Kerr Hunter & Burpee James Anderson | Margaret Isabella Hunter & Frederick Foster | Barbara Elizabeth Hunter & Newton James Anderson
Janet Nicholas Hunter & Herbert William Collins | James Copland Hunter & Mary Sarah Murray
James Copland Hunter & Edith Gertrude Barragher

 

From the Memoirs of Barbara (Hunter) Anderson

Auntie Jean was a very prime favorite and she told Maggie there was a fine young miller had come to McKees Mill at Kircudbright and he was a long way nicer than any of the lads around here and would make a good lad for Maggie. They met at Church and at several other places , and it was not long before William Hunter was seen walking along by the hedge in the direction of Bankend, dressed in his clean white moleskin suit, (some said he was a ghost as he was always seen in the evening) which he always wore except on Sundays when he wore black. Margaret's mother remarked, "he was a very civil spoken young man and she liked him, " well so did her daughter.

They had a big wedding on December 22, 1870, and one of the wedding presents was a dozen fruit cakes made for Christmas, from the Village Baker. There were many others, too. I remember seeing both glass and silver pieces that were presents but I cannot say now from whom they came. After a short tour to visit her husband's people, and a few places of historical interest, Burn's Cottage, Stirling Castle, etc. the bridge over the Nith, that was built of solid stone... They came back to the village and rented Congeith Cottage...

Then the question of a future home came up and Grandma Copland lent her persuasion to emigrating to Canada. For the two sons were already there. So in April, 1871 they took a ship at Glasgow, bound for Hamilton, Canada, on the steamship Ottawa.

- from Two White Oxen, A Perspective of Early Saskatoon, 1874-1904, from the Memoirs of Barbara Elizabeth (Hunter) Anderson, published a sold by Dr. R.N. Anderson, Lethbridge, Alberta, 1972

William Adam Hunter

William Adam Hunter
William Adam Hunter c. 1870
Photo courtesy Tracie McDougall
From
http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/24887253/person/1575401159

1871 ..........

1871 Scotland Census
William Adam Hunter & Margaret Copland

Name: William Hunter
Age: 25
Estimated birth year: abt 1846
Relationship: Head
Spouse's name : Margaret Hunter
Gender: Male
Where born: Kirkmahoe, Dumfrieshire
Registration Number: 872
Registration district: Kirkgunzeon
Civil Parish: Kirkgunzeon
County: Kirkcudbrightshire
Address: Congeith Cottage (part Of No 33 Above)
Occupation: Miller
ED: 3
Household schedule number: 34
LINE: 23
Roll: CSSCT1871_187
Household Members:
Name Age
William Hunter 25
Margaret Hunter 21

Source Citation Parish: Kirkgunzeon; ED: 3; Page: 8; Line: 23; Roll: CSSCT1871_187 Source Information Ancestry.com. 1871 Scotland Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007. Original data: Scotland. 1871 Scotland Census. Reels 1-191. General Register Office for Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland. Description The 1871 Census for Scotland was taken on the night of 2/3 April 1871. The following information was requested: place, name, relationship to head of family, marital status, age, gender, profession, birthplace, and whether blind, deaf, and dumb.

William's brother James was also living at Congeith Cottage with his wife Margaret Dodds

Ontario, Canada

William Hunter worked as a "car examiner" for the Great Western Railway.

Great Western Railway Travel via the Niagara Falls Suspension Bridge c 1876
Great Western Railway Travel via the Niagara Falls Suspension Bridge c 1876

The Great Western Railway was a historic Canadian railway that operated in Canada West and later the province of Ontario, following Confederation. Entrepreneur Samuel Zimmerman was instrumental in promoting its construction and Roswell Gardinier Benedict, a friend of Zimmerman's was the assistant chief engineer and later the chief engineer. This system stretched 1,371 kilometres (852 mi), running from Niagara Falls to Toronto and connecting lines to London, Windsor and communities in the Bruce Peninsula. Having begun operations in 1853, the company was purchased in August 1882 by the Grand Trunk Railway system and fully merged by 1884. The main Niagara Falls-Windsor line is now the Canadian National Railway's Grimsby Subdivision, Dundas Subdivision, Chatham Subdivision, and CASO Subdivision. The Toronto branch is the Oakville Subdivision, and the Sarnia branch is the Strathroy Subdivision (which also includes a short piece of the main line, from London to Komoka). - Wikipedia

 

1881 ..........

1881 Canada Census - Cayuga, Ontario
William Adam Hunter & Margaret Copland

Name: William Hunter
Gender: Male
Marital Status: Married
Age: 36
Birth Year: 1845
Birthplace: Scotland
Religion: Presbyterian
Nationality: Scotch (Scotish)
Occupation: ... Examiner
Province: Ontario
District Number: 146
District: Haldimand
Sub-District Number: E
Subdistrict: Cayuga
Household Members:
Name Age
William Hunter 36
Margaret Hunter 32
Mary Hunter 9
Barbara Hunter 7
Margaret Hunter 4
Jennet Hunter 8/10

Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 1881 Census of Canada [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2009. 1881 Canada Census Index provided by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints © Copyright 1999 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved. All use is subject to the limited use license and other terms and conditions applicable to this site. Images reproduced by courtesy of Library and Archives Canada, Ottawa, Canada. Original data: Canada. "Census of Canada, 1881." Statistics Canada Fonds, Record Group 31-C-1. LAC microfilm C-13162 to C-13286. Library and Archives Canada, Ottawa. http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/census/1881/Pages/about-census.aspxl. Description This database is an every name index to individuals enumerated in the 1881 Canada Census, the second census of Canada since confederation in 1867. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1881 Census (images are of Library and Archives Canada microfilm reels C-13162 to C-13286).


William Hunter (36, railway car examiner), Margaret (32), Mary (9), Barbara (7), Margaret (4) and Jennet (8 months)
See
original document

 

1883 ..........

Cayuga, Ontario, to Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

From the Memoirs of Barbara (Hunter) Anderson

On May 8, 1883, William Hunter and his wife and family of five little girls, the eldest only 11 years of age, left their old and familiar associates in the East, via Old Ontario, to face the unknown and almost untried life of a western farmer. According to literature received in their old home in Cayuga, Ontario, circulated by the Temperance Colonization Society, the West was a most desirable place to live , and the Temperance Colony, a real Utopia. Saskatoon, the best city of the Saskatchewan valley, being the centre of T.C. S. Lands, was bound to be important some day in the near future. A railroad had already been surveyed, within a few miles of it: Clarks Crossing (Clarkboro) on the main line of the C.N. Railway being near the old survey.

He was joined by his brother-in-law in the expense of a freight car, and together they purchased a few head of cattle, two oxen and two cows for each family, a horse, a dog and a cat, a couple dozen hens to be divided between them, and a little of the most necessary machinery , and the car was filled to capacity, each having very few household effects. The main part of these to be bought on arrival at Saskatoon. The brother-in-law, Thomas Copland (who died in 1906, bus is still remembered by many in Saskatoon), came in the car to take car of the stock, as Mrs. Copland had but one child to car for on the train journey, while Mr. and Mrs. Hunter had a bust time attending to the wants of five little ones.

The journey was by way of Detroit, Chicago, St. Paul before reaching Winnipeg, thence by newly constructed C.P.R. to Moose Jaw, then a village of new lumber and canvas. The car arrived after nine days travelling. Unloading proceeded during the next three days, during which time the cat escaped and was lost, and Mrs. Copland's horse was kidnapped.  Moose Jaw was putting on an event including horse racing on the 24th of May celebrations and as "Kate" looked like speed, she was put out of sight and could not be found till the first party of ox-team freight has started for Saskatoon and a substantial reward offered.

This incident necessitated Mrs. Copland and her child staying in Moose Jaw. Mr. and Mrs. Hunter and family, with Mrs. Hunter's brother, Mr. Copland, launched forth with two big loads of household effects, farm implements, the three cows, hens, etc., to find the way to Saskatoon. The journey lasted eleven days, and there was bitter disappointment when they came to the river to find that Saskatoon was not yet to be. Here they pitched their tents till the men could locate a homestead, but the land was not yet surveyed into sections, and they could only go by townships and range lines. In the meantime, another party had arrived consisting of Robert McCordick, John Conn and Mr. Pugsley. These among them had a yoke of oxen and a wagon, a tent and tin stove, so they plowed some sods and built the first dwelling in Saskatoon. It was quite small, about 12 X 14 with the usual half window and one door. I can't remember if it had two windows or one. These men invited Mrs. Hunter to take up residence in the new house, with her small baby, which she did.

- from Two White Oxen, A Perspective of Early Saskatoon, 1874-1904, from the Memoirs of Barbara Elizabeth (Hunter) Anderson, published a sold by Dr. R.N. Anderson, Lethbridge, Alberta, 1972

In 1883 Margaret's brother, Thomas Copland, encouraged them to move west with the Saskatoon Temperance Colonization Society and they built a home at Llewellyn. Margaret and William had 7 children; their two oldest daughters, Mary Kerr Hunter and Barbara Elizabeth Hunter, married brothers from the Anderson family – Burpee James Anderson and Newton Joseph Anderson, respectively. Margaret's brother, Thomas Copland, was one of the first settlers in Saskatoon, and was trained as a chemist and druggist. The University of Saskatchewan is located on his original homestead. - From University of Manitoba Archives

 

Illustration copied from Temperance Colonization Society pamphlet showing idealized future city of Saskatoon
Illustration copied from Temperance Colonization Society pamphlet showing idealized future city of Saskatoon

The Saskatoon Temperance Colonization Society

The first incident of this trip was camping for three days in a snowstorm a splendid introduction to pioneer life. Then came a huge mistake in the road by the assistant commissioner, in which he took the outfit down into the valley of Big Arm Creek, which they tried to cross, but had to return to high land. Trials in plenty followed, and the elbow of the South Branch of the Saskatchewan River was reached after some four days. Here the assistant commissioner was "treed" again by the band because he "didn't know where he was going, or the road he was travelling." They threatened to drown him in the river so he skipped out, riding seventy-five miles on horseback to Moose Jaw. They, however, came on courageously to their destination, and reached here in due time to meet the settlers of 1882, Messrs. Hamilton and Eby, already on the ground. Then followed Messrs, Clark and Sons, of whom Prank is still in the vicinity. They reached here and celebrated the 24th of May' as a holiday. Close by also were Mr. and Mrs, Copland and Mr. and Mrs. W. Hunter, each tasting for the first time but not the last, the trying experiences of pioneer life; and, indeed many experiences, the result of blunders by the Company adding much to the difficulties of locations, etc., which were difficult enough at best.

One incident of this year was a visit to the colony in the autumn, which no doubt will be remembered by many who witnessed it. Some sixty Indians came down at a gallop on the village, with the object of causing dismay and fear, and then demanded food. For a short time the prospects were alarming, but all turned out right. One lady was scared, and after giving them all she had to eat, ran off and left them to devour it; but Mrs. Copland, like the brave woman she is, successfully stood off the whole band though her husband was away in the hay field. During all the time up to this year the intercourse between the colony and the White Cap Indians was pleasant and agreeable; and so also with the half-breed population both north and south. There was little indication of the unrest which so soon after developed into the well-known rebellion of the ensuing year.

1884 ..........

The Riel Rebellion

Louis Riel c. 1880
Louis Riel c. 1880

From Saskatoon was sent the first word to Toronto announcing the arrival of Louis Riel on Canadian soil on this occasion, July 2nd, 1884, and his development as leader on the opening of the disturbance was well known.

Chief Whitecap, Sioux Chief of Moose Woods Reserve and members of his family, c. 1885
Chief Whitecap, Sioux Chief of Moose Woods Reserve and members of his family, c. 1885

True to the expectations of the Saskatoon people, the agitation extended to the White Cap Indians (1) under the influence of the Half-Breeds settled near the reserve, and as a result the entire population struck camp to join the rebellion at Batoche. On their way they had to pass Saskatoon, where preparations had been made to receive them either as friends or foes, as the case might he. The settlers had mostly been sworn in to defend the women and children, and had elected E. S. Andrews as captain of their home guard. They had also taken the precaution to let the Half-Breeds and Indians know that they were prepared for the emergency. We believe Chief Whitecap did not wish to leave the reserve, and join the rebellion, but the hot-headed warriors, influenced by a few Half-Breeds and emissaries from Riel, were disposed to be hostile, and the result was that the whole tribe appeared in sight of the village one fine morning. Our scouts had been watching them, and we knew of their coming. We suspected, too, (what we found afterwards to be true) that they had Riel's instructions to wipe Saskatoon out on their way north. They could not get round the village for the deep snow, and after trying in vain to do so, they came on and were stopped in the heart of the village for a conference. Mr. Hamilton was chosen as the representative of Saskatoon people, but could not take the job, and Mr. Copland had to step into the breach as the alternative choice. An attempt was made by friendly advice and warning of danger to get the Indians to go back to their reserve, but without result, and the whole party moved on, leaving Saskatoon unscathed. and still watching them so as to keep telegraphic communication.

1. These were Sioux, by repute the fiercest of the tribes of the Prairies. They bad taken part in the defeat and slaughter of the Custer column in 1876, by Sitting Bull. They took refuge In Canada, but did not return with the rest. They were given a Reserve at Moose Woods, with White Cap for chief.

The quick following events of the next few weeks culminated, upon the arrival of troops from the east, in the well-known battle of Fish Creek, the result of which was to again bring Saskatoon into the foreground as an important point. The necessity for hospital accommodation was immediately filled by the people placing all their resources in houses and stores, and the best help they possessed, at the disposal of the authorities. It was accepted, and for three months the village was one active scene of military life, and for the time it might be said that all attempts at settlement or agriculture were abandoned.

Northwest Rebellion, Battle of Batoche, May 9-12, 1885
Northwest Rebellion, Battle of Batoche, May 9-12, 1885

Through this opening of the houses to the wounded, diphtheria (for which there was no remedy known at that time) was brought to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Copland, who were thus bereft of their daughter, Jessie.

- Saskatoon Temperance Colonization Society

The Narrative of Mr. Archie Brown
from http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~sksaskat/NarrativesOfSaskatoon/28.html

In July we found that Geo. Garrison had come down for supplies and arranged with him to take us on his return trip. Early one mormog Wm. Horne and myself boarded the Garrison waggon and started on the trip. Another settler, Wm. Hunter, down with a yoke of oxen, was also returning with his load. The second day out Hunter took sick. Garrison made him as comfortable as possible on top of his load, and I volunteered to drive the oxen. I did not understand these animals, and they did not understand me. Whenever they came to a particularly bad spot they seemed to delight in going their own way through it. My cries of gee had no effect. When they got to deep enough water to suit them which was about up to their stomachs, they would stop and nothing I could do would induce them to move; the cool water on their stomachs was so pleasant and the plagues of flies would not reach what was in the water, so they were content.  I would have to get off, wade through the water and tramp a few miles ahead to where Garrison and the others were camped for a meal. Garrison would then come back with the horses and pull us out of the slough. Everything was novelty, and incidents like this served to break the monotony. Saskatoon was safely reached early one morning in August, Hunter slightly better, and myself a failure as a driver of oxen...     

Unidentified family posed outside their long sod house c. 1883
Unidentified family posed outside their long sod house c. 1883

My next job was helping Thos. Copland build his first house, a sod one. My sleeping place was the cellar of the new house covered with some boards. My pay was to be in butter taken during the winter as required. Mr. and Mrs. Copland treated me as their son, and their little daughter Jessie was a great favourite of mine, for children were scarce. Finally some lumber came down the river in the Fall of '83, brought down the river in two rafts from Rush Lake by a crew of Swedes. A water soaked and sand filled lot it was: every piece of flooring or siding had to have the groove scraped out before it would be lad; no edge could be kept on a plane in trying to work it, as the sand was ground right into the grain of the wood. The rafts were soon broken up and the lumber piled on the river bank of what is now Idylwyld to dry and the buildings started. The Swedes put up what was called the Company Buildings, really a double store front: they then left for Moose Jaw. R. W. Dulmage, Chas. Garrison and Silas Lake put up buildings, mere shells, but it entitled them to a free lot. Geo. Grant put up quite a pretentious building, McGowan, W. Horn and myself being the carpenters. This was the extent of the building that Fall. During the, winter W. Horn and- myself put up a small building for John Conn, and towards spring started one for the Company. This used up all the lumber brought down the river. The uses to which the various buildings put up that first fall were put were as follows: The Company stores were occupied by Dr. Willoughby. Fred Davidson and D. W. McDonald and G. K. Smith, while Dulmage occupied his own. The Garrison building was sold to the Fletchers when they arrived, as C. Garrison did not return from Ontario, the Silas Lake (1) building was used as school church, public meeting place and exhibition building, the Conn building became the Trounce store, the Company dwelling house was occupied by various tenants, the Clarks, Pendygrasse, Fletchers and by T. Copland as the Company's Agent. The Grant building, occupied by the McGowan family the first winter. was used later by Capt. May, Wm. Sinclair, and as N.W.M.P. Police Barracks...

The forty miles to Saskatoon were made in about two and a half days, and the people were glad to see us, as they thought we must have all perished.

We had returned, however, with a scant supply of flour, as a large part of it had been consumed on the journey, a large batch of bread being made up at the Elbow. To make matters still worse the coal oil had leaked and given a decided flavour to the flour. One had the taste of coal oil in one's mouth all day. The diet for the rest of the winter consisted of snow-shoe rabbit, an occasional prairie chicken, and corn, of which Dr. Willoughby had a supply in his tent store. For dessert we had dried apples. As soon as the snow began to soften Wm. Hunter decided to make a trip to Duck Lake to get some flour. He had oxen, and could only travel while the snow was soft, as crusted snow cut their legs. He returned in about a week with some of the Duck Lake patent process.  It was made from badly frozen wheat, in an old mill of the stone type, and it was almost the colour of chocolate. Yeast refused to work in it. As soon as water or milk was put in and one started to mix the dough, it would stick like glue to the fingers, and it took a knife to scrape it off. However, it was decided by all that got some of it that it was the finest and best for making bread of some kind that they had ever eaten, just like cake. This ended the winter of 83-4. There had been one death, Robt. Clark-W. Horn and myself making the coffin. There were two births - one to the McGowan family and to the Richardson family.     

- from http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~sksaskat/NarrativesOfSaskatoon/28.html

Note: Llewellyn, Saskatchewan. William Hunter and Mrs Hunter were postmasters from 1892-1897 and Gwilym Lewis postmaster from 1903-1915. There were 71 homesteaders who proved up on their claim named William Hunter of which SW4-T37-R4-W3 belonged to one William Hunter... There is a Llewellyn cemetery located North-East quarter, Section 4, Township 38, Range 4, West of 3rd. In further research in 1894, National Archives holds these two records: Notice of the arrangements made for mail service between Llewellyn and Saskatoon NWT, and in 1897a file for the Notice of the Closing of the post office at Llewellyn and the discontinuance of the Llewellyn and Saskatoon mail service.

The Story of Mrs. Margaret Hunter

Grandma Hunter - An Early Settler Here
The Saskatoon Daily
University of Saskatchewan Archives
See original document

Trading with Indians
Trading with Indians
University of Saskatchewan Archives

Agnes Hunter (William Adam Hunter's aunt) died on Sept 23, 1884, in Kirkton, Kirkmahoe, Dumfriesshire, at the age of 85.

 

1885 ..........

 

From the Memoirs of Barbara (Hunter) Anderson

The next year, 1885, brought much sorrow and anxiety to parents at least, and when news of the Indian Rebellion reached Saskatoon, it was with fear and excitement that some made plans to take all the horse teams with the women and children and go to Moose Jaw or Regina. Mr. Hunter opposed this plan, for the cold was still intense and the snow was very deep. The women and children would perish with cold on the way, or if not, the Indians who were more used to traveling in winter , could easily overtake them and they would be more defenceless on the open prairie, than in their own homes. His advice was stay together, work and fight and pray. It it is God's will that we should live. He can protect us as well in one place as another. So the settlement waited and prayed, and one day came the glad news that soldiers from Ontario and Quebec were on their way to put down the rebellion. Then came the question of food for the soldiers who had only what they could carry with them. Mr. and Mrs. Hunter sold hay, milk, bread, butter and whatever food they could get, to the soldiers in camp at Clark's Crossing , as did everyone else in the settlement...

These men met the enemy in a three-day engagement in May at Fish Creek and Batoche, and Riel escaped across the river, but later was taken or gave himself up, and Gabriel Dumont escaped to the United States from hence he returned later to his home and friends at Batoche. Several of our soldiers were killed, some were wounded and brought back to Saskatoon to be cared for. When the wounded arrived, Mr. Copland immediately called on his sister Mrs. Hunter , to help, and she volunteered to nurse - when the Government nurses arrived from Winnipeg, Mrs. Hunter volunteered to stay on, if needed, and was thankfully receivedand worked in the hospitals till the men went back. Some died - I do not know how many - I know of only one, his name was Sheponci, or sounded like that. He was a Frenchman from Quebec and he died when his legs were amputated, and was buried in the "Old Nuntana Cemetery". Mrs. Hunter worked in one of the three hospitals for three months, and received payment from the Government. Mr. Hunter hauled clean, upriver water to supply the three hospitals, as well as cold spring water for drinking, from Mrs. Clark's well about two miles out of town.

- from Two White Oxen, A Perspective of Early Saskatoon, 1874-1904, from the Memoirs of Barbara Elizabeth (Hunter) Anderson, published a sold by Dr. R.N. Anderson, Lethbridge, Alberta, 1972

 

1891 ..........

1891 Census of Canada - Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
William Hunter & Margaret Copland

Name: William Hunter
Gender: Male
Marital Status: Married
Age: 45
Birth Year: abt 1846
Birthplace: Scotland
Relation to Head of House: Head
Religion: Free Church
French Canadian: No
Spouse's Name: Margaret Hunter
Father's Birth Place: Scotland
Mother's Birth Place: Scotland
Province: Territories
District Number: 200
District: Saskatchewan
Subdistrict: Saskatoon
Household Members:
Name Age
William Hunter 45
Margaret Hunter 41
Mary Hunter 19
Barbara Hunter 16
Maggie Hunter 13
Janet Hunter 10
Wiley Hunter 8
James Hunter 3
William Hunter 3

Territories; Roll: T-6426; Family No: 35. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1891 Census of Canada [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2008. Original data: Library and Archives Canada. Census of Canada, 1891. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Library and Archives Canada, 2009. <http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/databases/census-1891/index-e.html>. Series RG31-C-1. Statistics Canada Fonds. Microfilm reels: T-6290 to T-6427. Description: The third census of Canada covers seven provinces - British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, and Quebec - and the Northwest Territories, which at the time was comprised of the districts of Alberta, Assiniboia East, Assiniboia West, Saskatchewan, and Mackenzie River. The census provides many details about individuals and families including: name, gender, age, relationship to head of household, marital status, birthplace, religion, and occupation.

"Wiley" is Ellen Agnes

 

1892 ..........

Mary Kerr Hunter & Burpee James Anderson

Mary Kerr Hunter married Burpee James Anderson (son of Thomas Edward Anderson and Elizabeth Sarah) on Oct 25, 1892. The had at least ten children: Renwick William Hunter (born June 11, 1893, died Sept 27, 1918); Thomas Edward (born Dec 10, 1894, died May 22, 1972); Newton Burpee (born Dec 24, 1896, died Aug 19, 1984); Roy Warden (born March 21, 1899, died Nov 20, 1985); Janet Elizabeth (born Dec 5, 1901, died Feb 24, 1963): James Alexander (born Aug 3, 1904, died Sept 14, 1985); Margaret Ellen (born Feb 2, 1907, died Oct 6, 1994); Mary Augusta (born Nov 15, 1909, died Jan 12, 1994); Wilhelmina Marjorie (born Jan 25, 1913, died May 6, 1912); and Laura Clara (born Sept 28, 1916). - from Twig Tree And Treasure A Genealogical Soujourn on rootsweb.ancestry.com & eHealth Saskatchewan, Government of Saskatchewan

Thomas Edward Anderson & Dorothy Gertrude Alice Wright | Roy Warden Anderson & Dorothy Elizabeth Edwards
Janet Elizabeth Anderson & Leonard M. Clark | James Alexander Anderon & Daisy Mary White
Margaret Ellen Anderson & Erwell Joseph Davison | Mary Augusta Anderson & Robert Henry Anderson
Wilhelmina Marjorie Anderson & Thomas Grant | Wilhelmina Marjorie Anderson & Ernest Walter Crowe
Laura Clara Anderson & John Ashton Hill

 

1894 ..........

William Adam Hunter

From the Memoirs of Barbara (Hunter) Anderson

Mr. Hunter took ill with pleurisy during the winter of 1890 and 1891 after which an accident , in his weakness, caused an illness which resulted in his death on September 12, 1894.

No doctor and no hospital near, and no money to go where help could be obtained, was the sad experience of pioneers of the early days.

- from Two White Oxen, A Perspective of Early Saskatoon, 1874-1904, from the Memoirs of Barbara Elizabeth (Hunter) Anderson, published a sold by Dr. R.N. Anderson, Lethbridge, Alberta, 1972

William Adam Hunter died on Sept 12, 1894, at the age of 49, and is buried in the Llewellyn Cemetery north of Saskatoon.

In Loving Memory of William Hunter
In Loving Memory of William Hunter

William Hunter Born in Kirkmahoe June 7, 1845
William Hunter Born in Kirkmahoe June 17, 1845
Llewellyn / Hunter Cemetery
Photo courtesy Elaine Pain

 

1895 ..........

William Hunter (William Adam Hunter's father) died on Aug 11, 1895, in Dunscore, Dumfriesshire, at the age of 90.

 

Map of Canada, 1898
Map of Canada, 1898

 

1899 ..........

Little Stone School, Saskatoon, 1899
Little Stone School, Saskatoon, 1899
Prominent names include Caswell, Clinkskill, Leslie, Hunter, Cairns Powe, Garrison

 

Margaret Isabella Hunter married Frederick Foster on Oct 4, 1899, at the Llewellyn Farm north of Saskatoon. They had nine children: John William (born Aug 10, 1901); Ralph Hunter (born March 7, 1904, died 1991); Sydney Hamilton (1906-2001); Abram (born Nov 25, 1907); Ann Emily (1909-1996); Robert Frederick (1911-2001); Russell Norman (1913-2010); George Stephen (1918-2-10); and Oscar Frank (1921-1943). - from Hunter Tree, ancestry.com and eHealth Saskatchewan, Government of Saskatchewan

Ralph Hunter Foster & Jean Ellen Hunter | Ann Emily Foster & Henry Donald Pryor | Robert Frederick Foster & Pearl Katherine Sitch
Russell Norman Foster & Kay Kennedy | George Stephen Foster & Jean A. Rea

 

1900 ..........

Burpee James Anderson & Mary Kerr Hunter
with four eldest boys

Burpee James Anderson & Mary Kerr Hunter
Photo courtesy Ron Anderson

 

1903 ..........

Thomas Copland Curling Team, Saskatoon, 1903-1904
Thomas Copland Curling Team, Saskatoon, 1903-1904

 

1906 ..........

1906 Census of Canada - Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta
Humbolt, Saskatchewan
Margaret Copland Hunter and family

Name: Margret Hunter
Gender: Female
Marital Status: Married
Age: 56
Birthplace: Scotland
Relation to Head of House: Head
Immigration Year: 1872
Province: Saskatchewan
District: Humboldt
Sub-District Description: That part of the district of Humboldt bounded on the east by the line between ranges 3 and 4, on the north and west by the South Saskatchewan River, and on the south by the line dividing Townships 30 and 31, all west of the 3rd M
Sub-District: 8
Household Members:
Name Age
Margret Hunter 56
Ellen A Hunter 22
James C Hunter 19
William Hunter 19

Souce Citation: Year: 1906; Census Place: 8, Humboldt, Saskatchewan; Page: 47; Family No: 248. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1906 Canada Census of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. Original data: Library and Archives Canada. Census of the Northwest Provinces, 1906. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Library and Archives Canada, 2008. <http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/databases/census-1906/index-e.html>. Series RG31-C-1. Statistics Canada Fonds. Microfilm reels: T-18353 to T-18363. Images are reproduced with the permission of Library and Archives Canada. Description: This database is an every name index to individuals enumerated in the 1906 Census of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta and also includes images of the original census documents. Information listed includes: name of each person in the househould, gender, age, birthplace, relationship to head of household, and year of immigration to canada.

William Adam Hunter, Jr. drowned in the North Saskatchewan River on Aug 12, 1906

 

Mary Kerr Hunter & Burpee James Anderson and Family

Mary Kerr Hunter & Burpee James Anderson and Family
Left to right: Robert Hosie (hired man), Renwick William Hunter, Mary Kerr Hunter, Janet Elizabeth, Burpee James Anderson,
James Alexander, Newton Burpee, Roy Warden, Thomas Edward and John Ferreter (hired man)
Photo courtesy Ron Anderson

The photo was taken in 1906. Burpee’s original mud and pole “house” is still attached at the left (west) end (in white wash) and was used as the kitchen. (My dad, Jim, is the toddler in Burpee’s arms.) By 1906 they were very large farmers for that era, owning and farming at least 4 quarter sections – unheard of at that time. - Ron Anderson

 

1914 ..........

The Great War, 1914-1918

Renwick William Hunter Anderson
1893-1918

Lieutenant Renwick William Hunter Anderson
Lieutenant Renwick William Hunter Anderson
Canadian Infantry, 10th Battalion
Photo courtesy James Anderson

Agricultural Graduates - Renwick William Hunter Anderson, University of Saskatchewan, 1915
Agricultural Graduates - Renwick William Hunter Anderson, University of Saskatchewan, 1915
University of Saskatchewan Archives


Attestation Paper, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force
See original document

 

1917 ..........

James Copland Hunter & Mary Sarah Murray

James Copland Hunter married Mary Sarah Murray (daughter of William Murray and Louisa Stuart) on June 27, 1917, in Sutherland Presbyterian Church, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.

Children of James Hunter and Mary Murray are:

i. William Murray Hunter, born 23 September 1919; married (1) Phyllis Strickland 14 March 1952 in Yorkton, Saskatchewan, Canada; born 14 March 1932; died September 1967; married (2) Constance Elizabeth Bocking 5 March 1977 in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; born 19 October 1928; died 30 November 2006 in St. Paul's Hospital, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.

ii. Ruth Louisa Margaret Hunter, born 18 May 1922 in farm North of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; married James Alexander Ewen 27 June 1946 in Third Avenue United Church, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.

iii. Eric James Stuart Hunter, born 17 October 1927; married Irene Parr 5 July 1952 in Ontario, Canada; born 1 December 1932

- from Daelick-Ewen Family Tree on ancestry.com

 

1918 ..........

Canada's Hundred Days

Canada’s Hundred Days was a series of attacks made along the Western Front by the Canadian Corps during the Hundred Days Offensive of World War I. Reference to this period as Canada's Hundred Days is due to the substantial role the Canadian Corps of the British First Army played in causing the retreat of the German Army in a series of major battles from Amiens to Mons which along with other Allied offensives ultimately led to Germany's final defeat and surrender. Though generally referred to as the 'Hundred Days' in the English-speaking world outside of Canada, the period is more frequently recognized in Belgium and France - particularly in the areas in which the Canadians fought - as "les cent jours du Canada." During this time, the Canadian Corps fought at Amiens, Arras, the Hindenburg Line, the Canal du Nord, Bourlon Wood, Cambrai, Denain, Valenciennes and finally at Mons, on the final day of the First World War. - from Canada's Last Hundred Days in the First World War, Canada at War

Do you remember Canal du Nord?

Canal du Nord — The last major operation of the 10th Battalion, part of the Battle of Cambrai. The Fighting 10th mounted a crossing of this obstacle on 27–28 September 1918, suffering heavy losses. - From Wikipedia

Next up was the Canal du Nord, which formed part of the main Hindenburg Line. The partially-completed canal's earthworks made it a tough position to attack, but Canadian Corps commander Lieutenant-General Sir Arthur Currie came up with a daring plan. His men, along with a British division, would cross a 2,500 metre-wide dry section of the canal. However, this was a bottleneck that could cause Allied troops and equipment to bunch up and become easy targets. To cover the advance, Currie unleashed the heaviest single-day bombardment of the entire war and the September 27 attack was a stunning success. The Canadians broke through three lines of German defence and pressed on to capture Bourlon Wood. Combined with other successes along the British front, the Hindenburg Line was now breached... The German army may have been retreating but that did not mean they stopped resisting. After further heavy fighting, Canadians helped capture the town of Cambrai and by October 11 the Corps had reached the Canal de la Sensée. This was the last action taken by the Corps as a whole but the individual Canadian divisions continued to fight, overcoming stiff German resistance and helping capture Mont Houy and Valenciennes by the beginning of November. - from Canada's Last Hundred Days in the First World War, Canada at War

See Crossing the Canal, Combined Arms Operations at the Canal du Nord September - October 1918 by David Borys
See Canada and the First World War, War Diaries, Canal du Nord

 

Killed in Action


Lieutenant Renwick William Hunter Anderson, Sept 27, 1918
See original document

Lieutenant Renwick William Hunter Anderson (son of Mary Kerr Hunter and Burpee James Anderson) was killed in France on Sept 27, 1918, and is buried in the Haynecourt British Cemetery in France. See Soldiers of the First World War

 

Narrative of Operations, 10th Canadian Infantry Battalion, from Sept 27, 1918 to October 3, 1918


- From Collections Canada, War Diaries of the First World War, 10th Canadian Infantry Battalion, Sept 27, 1918

 

Map of the Battle of Canal du Nord showing Haynecourt
Map of the Battle of Canal du Nord showing Haynecourt




- From Collections Canada, War Diaries of the First World War, 10th Canadian Infantry Battalion, Sept 27, 1918

Canadian Expeditionary Force entering Cambrai, France
Canadian Expeditionary Force entering Cambrai, France

From Walter Murray: The Lengthened Shadow - Lieut. R. W. H. Anderson
From Walter Murray: The Lengthened Shadow - Lieut. R. W. H. Anderson
University of Saskatchewan Archives

These are they who went forth from this University
to the Great War of 1914-1918
and gave their lives that we might live in freedom

Renwick William Hunter Anderson
Renwick William Hunter Anderson
Photo courtesy Kiva Waugh

 

1921 ..........

1921 Census of Canada - Aberdeen, Sashatchewan
James Copland Hunter & Mary Sarah Murray

Name: James C Hunter
Gender: Male
Marital Status: Married
Age: 33
Birth Year: abt 1888
Birth Place: Saskatchewan
Relation to Head of House: Head
Spouse's Name: Mary V Hunter
Father Birth Place: Scotland
Mother Birth Place: Scotland
Racial or Tribal Origin: Scotch (Scotish)
Province or Territory: Saskatchewan
District: Saskatoon
District Number: 227
Sub-District Number: 16
City, Town or Village: Aberdeen
Section Number: 4
Township Number: 38
Range Number: 4
Meridian Number: 3
Municipality: Aberdeen
Occupation: Farmer
Household Members:
Name Age
James C Hunter 33
Mary V Hunter 26
William M Hunter 1

Source Citation: Reference Number: RG 31; Folder Number: 161; Census Place: , Saskatoon, Saskatchewan; Page Number: 24. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1921 Census of Canada [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2013. Original data: Library and Archives Canada. Sixth Census of Canada, 1921. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Library and Archives Canada, 2013. Series RG31. Statistics Canada Fonds. Images are reproduced with the permission of Library and Archives Canada. Description: Find your Ancestors in the 1921 Canadian Census. Canada added 1,581,840 new residents between 1911 and 1921. The Prairie Provinces were the big gainers, with Alberta and Saskatchewan each growing by more than 50 percent.

 

1927 ..........

Mary Kerr Hunter & James Burpee Anderson
Mary Kerr Hunter & James Burpee Anderson
Photo courtesy Ron Anderson

The tree behind them was a massive poplar by the time I was a young boy and we used to climb it and go out on a very large limb that extended over the roof, and then we would drop down onto the roof. This was how we “played” as kids. - Ron Anderson

 

1930 ..........

James Burpee Anderson, c. 1930
James Burpee Anderson, c. 1930
Photo courtesy Ron Anderson

 

1934 ..........

Mary Sarah Murray (daughter of William Murray and Louisa Stuart and wife of James Copland Hunter) died on May 21, 1934, and us buried in the Llewellyn Cemetery.

Mary Murray Hunter 1894-1934
Mary Murray Hunter 1894-1934
Llewellyn / Hunter Cemetery
Photo courtesy Elaine Pain

 

1935 ..........

Margaret Copland Hunter, 1935
Margaret Copland Hunter, 1935

 

1937 ..........

Burpee James Anderson
1868 - 1937

In Loving Memory of Father Burpee James Anderson, 1868-1937
In Loving Memory of Father Burpee James Anderson, 1868-1937
Mother Mary Kerr, 1871-1956
Silton Cemetery, Silton Saskatchewan
Photo courtesy Ron Anderson

 

 

1940 ..........

Margaret Elizabeth Copland died on Feb 18, 1940, in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, at the age of 90.

In Loving Memory of Margaret Copland Hunter
In Loving Memory of Margaret Copland Hunter
Interred in Family cemetery

 

1951 ..........

Barbara Elizabeth Hunter
April 19, 1874 - September 19, 1951

Barbara Elizabeth Hunter
Courtesy Saskatoon Public Library

68 Years in the District

Barbara Elizabeth Hunter - 68 years in the District
Courtesy Saskatoon Public Library

Barbara E. Hunter, Born April 19, 1874, Died Sept 19, 1951
Rock of Ages
Barbara E. Hunter, Born April 19, 1874, Died Sept 19, 1951
Safe in the Arms of Jesus
Llewellyn / Hunter Cemetery
Photo courtesy Elaine Pain

 

1957 ..........

James Copland Hunter & Edith Gertrude Barragher

James Copland Hunter married Edith Gertrude Barragher on April 27, 1957. - from Daelick-Ewen Family Tree on ancestry.com

Edith Gertrude Barager is daughter of Mahlon Barager, brother of Richard Gordon Barager my great great grandfather. Gertrude is buried in the Warman cemetery. - Elaine Pain

 

1970 ..........

The Hunter home, LLewellyn, Saskatchewan c. 1970
The Hunter house, LLewellyn, Saskatchewan c. 1970
Photo courtesy of Elaine and Joan Pain

 

1979 ..........

James Copland Hunter died on April 5, 1979, and is buried in the Llewellyn Cemetery.

James Copland Hunter 1887-1979
James Copland Hunter 1887-1979
Llewellyn / Hunter Cemetery
Photo courtesy Elaine Pain

 

The South Saskatchewan River and the Development of Early Saskatoon 1881-1908

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